How PC Cases Are Made: Inside NZXT’s Factory

PC cases are one of the essential pieces of hardware in a computer. They keep your components safe and in good working order. But do you know how they’re made? Here’s an inside look at NZXT’s factory through a document from their website.

The History of NZXT

NZXT is a computer hardware company that creates high-quality custom cases for users and enthusiasts. Founded in 2002 by John Cheng, NZXT is headquartered in the United States and has subsidiaries in Europe and Asia.

NZXT started as a small case maker based out of California. In 2002, John Cheng founded the company with one goal – to create the world’s best cases.

From the beginning, NZXT has been committed to providing quality products that allow users to build powerful systems.

NZXT’s flagship product line is its H440 case series. The H440 was designed to provide top-tier performance while maintaining an elegant design.

The H440 features a clean and modern look that can be customized with different color options and fan mounts. Other popular NZXT products include the Kraken X40 Liquid Cooling System, R2 Platinum Edition graphics cards, and Obsidian 750D Case.

Through its dedication to quality and innovation, NZXT has become one of the leading computer case manufacturers in the world. With products catering to casual and hardcore users, NZXT continues to set the standard for quality case manufacturing.

What Happens in a PC Case’s Factory?

PC cases come in all shapes and sizes, but some basic components are common.

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PC cases are made from various materials, but the most popular ones are steel and plastic. Plastic is often used for cheaper cases but only lasts for a short time as steel.

A PC case’s main purpose is to protect your computer, so it needs to be strong enough to hold the machine in place and keep dust and other particles out.

The first step in making a PC case is cutting the metal plates that will form the case’s skeleton. The plates are then bent into the desired shape using pressure and heat machines. After they’re bent, the plates are cut to their final dimensions and welded together using a special welding process.

Some parts of a PC case, like the front and side panels, must be designed specifically for each computer model.

Other parts may be compatible with many different models, but they may need to be modified to fit properly. For example, the screws holding a PC motherboard often vary from model to model.

The next step in making a PC case is assembling the individual parts. This includes installing the motherboard, graphics card, power supply unit (PSU), fans, vents, and other components that will be housed inside the case.

Some parts may require additional assembly before being installed into the case. For example, desktop PCs often include an

How Does It Work?

PC cases are built by a process known as injection molding. Injection molding is a manufacturing technique in which liquid plastic is injected into a heated metal die, which is forced thickly under high pressure to create the desired product.

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The different parts of the case are created separately and then assembled, much like how a toy is put together. 

The first step in the process is to create the model of the case that will be manufactured. This model is lightweight plastic and can be sized down or enlarged as needed.

Once the model is complete, it creates a CAD file for computer-aided design. This file allows technicians to blueprint all of the intricate details of the case, including how many fan ports and drive bays will be included. 

Once the CAD file is completed, it’s time to create the actual case pieces using a three-dimensional printer. First, technicians print out copies of each shape required for the case, called shells.

The shells are then cut out and cleaned using special tools before being melted down and cast into metal molds. 

Next comes the fun part: injecting plastic into those hot metal molds! Injection molding involves filling a cavity with liquid plastic and forcing it under high pressure until it hardens into what you’re looking for.

The different parts of the case are created separately and then assembled, much.

Why Does It Take So Long?

PC cases are made on a large, industrial scale in New Zealand. In the past, PC cases were mostly made by hand, and it would take weeks or even months to produce a single case.

Today, most PC cases are produced on an industrial scale using automated machines. This article explains why it takes so long to produce a PC case and how NZXT has improved the process over the years.

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PC cases used to be made by hand, which could take weeks or even months to produce a single case. Today, most PC cases are produced on an industrial scale using automated machines.

This process is more efficient and produces higher quality cases than ever before, but it takes time to set up and learn how to use these machines.

The first step in the manufacturing process is designing the case template. This template creates multiple copies of the case that will be customized for each customer’s specific requirements. Once the template is complete, the machines start cutting out all of the different parts of the case.

The next step is assembling the components of the case using automated tools. The machine can weld, rivet, and screw together all the different pieces of metal in just minutes, making for a much more consistent product overall.

Once all the components are assembled, they are tested for fit and accuracy before being sent off for final assembly by human hands. Lastly, necessary modifications or adjustments are made before production can continue.

Conclusion

we look inside NZXT’s factory and see how their PC cases are made. We glimpse the intricate process of manufacturing these cases and discuss some of the challenges NZXT had to overcome to create such high-quality products.

I hope you enjoyed learning about NZXT’s manufacturing process, and if you’re ever interested in purchasing one of their cases, be sure to check out their website!


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Matt Wilson
By Matt Wilson

Matt Wilson is a PC gaming and hardware expert with years of experience. He's a trusted tech product reviewer for gamers and tech enthusiasts.


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