How To Find Out What Motherboard You Have Installed

You might wonder if you’re pushing your PC too far or trying to upgrade your computer, but you might not know what motherboard you have installed. Luckily, there is a way for you to find out without opening up the case and digging through parts.

How to Check What Motherboard You Have Installed

To determine which motherboard you have installed, it is necessary to open up your computer and look at the motherboard. There are a few ways to do this:

  1. If your computer has a removable cover, remove the cover. Look for the motherboard on the back of the computer.
  2. If your computer does not have a removable cover or cannot see the motherboard, you can access it by removing one or more of the case screws. Once you have removed the screws, pull out the motherboard.
  3. You can also check to see which type of processor your computer has by looking for markings on the socket. Most computers have either an LGA 1155 (Socket H2), an LGA 1156 (Socket H3), or an LGA 1366 (Socket P).

Once you know which type of motherboard you have installed, follow these steps to determine what driver version is currently installed:  

  1.  Open Windows Update and click “Available Updates” in the left-hand column.  
  2.  In the “Available Updates” window that opens, right-click on “Windows 7” and select “Properties” from the menu that pops up.   
  3. In the Properties windows that open, select “Delivery Optimization” from under “Update Options” and then click on “Change Settings” to view the “Delivery Optimization” window.   
  4. In the “Delivery Optimization” window, select “Microsoft Windows 7” from the list of updates and then click on the “Change Settings” button.   
  5. On the “Driver Options” tab, select “Show Updated Driver Files Only” and then click on the “OK” button.
See also  Do You Need A PC Case?

If you have a driver version older than the current driver version installed, Windows will offer to update your driver automatically. If you want to update your driver manually, click on the “Uninstall Updates” button and then follow the instructions that appear.

How to Update Your Motherboard

If you’re looking for a way to find out what motherboard you have installed on your computer, there are a few ways to do this. One way is to open the Start menu and type “msinfo32” into the search bar.

This will open up the Windows System Information window, which will list all the installed hardware on your computer. 

If you’re unsure which motherboard you have, you can also check the BIOS settings on your computer. Some motherboards may include a screen that shows all of the compatible processors and motherboards currently installed in your computer.

Which motherboard should I buy for my PC?

If you’re looking to buy a motherboard for your PC, there are a few things to consider. 

First, what type of PC do you have? There are different types of motherboards that are designed specifically for different types of PCs. 

Second, what kind of components do you want to install? Some motherboards come with pre-installed components like graphics cards and hard drives, while others are more generic and can be used with almost any PC. 

Third, how much money do you want to spend? Motherboards range in price from around $20 to $200.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can I upgrade my computer’s motherboard?

Most likely, yes. Upgrading a computer’s motherboard usually requires removing the old one and installing the new one. Be sure to consult your computer’s owner’s manual for more information. 

Can I clean my computer’s motherboard?

Yes, you can clean your computer’s motherboard using a can of compressed air and a soft cloth.

Conclusion

If you’re having trouble finding out what motherboard you have installed on your computer, there are a few things you can do to find out. First, make sure that you have unplugged your computer and taken the cover off of it.

Second, take a picture or list of the markings on the motherboard (these will be different depending on which motherboard you have). Finally, if those methods don’t work for you, try searching online for instructions on how to identify your motherboard type. Good luck!


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Matt Wilson
By Matt Wilson

Matt Wilson is a PC gaming and hardware expert with years of experience. He's a trusted tech product reviewer for gamers and tech enthusiasts.


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