What is Sys Fan On Motherboard

Sys Fan on Motherboard is a “process” designed to cool the motherboard down. It was introduced in the early days of personal computers and was a very expensive item back then since it needed a blower fan.

Even though the prices have been reduced, cooling the motherboard is still not widely used.

What is the SYS Fan on Motherboard?

The SYS fan on the motherboard is responsible for cooling the system. It uses various methods, such as moving air through the system, using fans, and releasing heat. If your motherboard does not have a built-in fan, you may need to install one.

Why do I need an SYS fan on my motherboard?

A sys fan is a small, quiet device that helps to keep your computer cool. By blowing air over the CPU and other components, a sys fan can help to keep them from overheating and failing.

When you install a new motherboard, it may come with a built-in sys fan. If not, you can usually find one separately from online retailers.

If your computer starts running hotter than usual, it might be time to replace your motherboard’s sys fan. Overheating can cause your computer to fail or become unstable, so taking care of your hardware is important!

Benefits of using an SYS fan on your motherboard

An SYS fan on your motherboard is a great way to improve your computer’s cooling and performance. An SYS fan helps cool the processor, graphics card, memory, and other onboard components.

By keeping your motherboard cooler, you can reduce the chance of system failure and improve overall performance. Additionally, by improving airflow through your system, you can reduce the heat that builds up inside your computer.

An SYS fan is also a good way to improve case airflow. By moving air around your computer, an SYS fan can help alleviate hot spots and ensure that your system stays at its best.

What can go wrong with using an SYS fan on your motherboard

An SYS fan on a motherboard is designed to cool the system’s processor and chipset. If the fan fails, it can overheat and cause the system to fail. The fan may also become jammed, which can cause the system to overheat or even smoke.

See also  What is AMDs Fidelityfx Super Resolution?

How to use an SYS fan correctly.

An SYS fan is a cooling fan designed to keep the system cool by providing airflow over the hardware. The best way to use an SYS fan is by following these guidelines:

  • Make sure that your motherboard has a built-in SYS fan. If it does not, you will need to purchase a separate SYS fan.
  • When installing or replacing the SYS fan, make sure that the airflow directed at the CPU and chipset is uninterrupted. This can be done by orienting the fan, so its axis points downwards or using an intake shield if possible.
  • If your computer becomes too hot, disconnect the power supply and check to see if the fans are spinning. If they are not spinning, you may need to replace your CPU or motherboard cooler.

How to Check if Your System Has a Sys Fan on Motherboard

When troubleshooting a system issue, and you suspect the problem might be related to a malfunctioning or overheated system fan, it’s important to determine if your system has one. There are a few ways to check this. 

Method 1: Check for an Onboard Fan Tray

If your system has an onboard fan tray, you can check to see if the fan is spinning by plugging in a power supply and turning on the system. If the fan starts spinning, then the fan is operational. 

If your system does not have an onboard fan tray, or if the fan doesn’t start spinning when you plug in power, then your next step is to check for a System Fan header on the motherboard. 

Method 2: Check for System Fan Header on Motherboard

The most common way to find a System Fan header on motherboards is using a motherboard jumper cable. To do this, locate the motherboard near an outlet and turn off all other devices in the area so that you have direct access to the motherboard.

Plug in one end of the jumper cable into one of the headers found near the CPU (on some motherboards, there may be more than one), and plug in another end of the jumper cable into an outlet or computer.

If there is power going into both ends of the jumper cable, then there is a System Fan header on your motherboard, and you can proceed with testing as instructed below. 

The following instructions will vary depending on the make and model of your motherboard, but typically you will need to press a button or switch on the front of the computer to enable the testing.

On some motherboards, this switch is labeled “System Fan.” Once the System Fan header is enabled, you can use a power supply to test if the fan is spinning by plugging it into one of the headers on the motherboard. If the fan starts spinning, then your system fan is operational. 

See also  What is AMD Stock Cooler?

If you don’t find a System Fan header on your motherboard, or if the fan doesn’t start spinning when you plug in power, then your next step is to check for a Sys Fan connector on the system case. 

Method 3: Check for Sys Fan Connector on System Case

The most common way to find a Sys Fan connector on system cases is by using a screwdriver to remove the cover of the system case.

Once the cover is removed, you should be able to see either a single or multiple connectors labeled “Sys Fan.” If you don’t see a Sys Fan connector, or if the connector isn’t operational, your next step is to check for a System Fan header on the motherboard.

How do you adjust your motherboard fan speed?

Adjusting motherboard fan speed is important in optimizing your system’s cooling performance. Adjusting the fan speed ensures that your processor and other components stay cool during extended periods of heavy usage.

To adjust motherboard fan speed:

  1. Open the computer’s case and locate the motherboard. Many motherboards have a small, square-shaped connector on the back of them near the CPU (or northbridge). Most cases will also access the boards through the bottom or front panel.
  2. Connect one end of an appropriate power supply cable to the motherboard connector and plug the other end into a nearby electrical outlet.
  3. Turn on the computer and wait until it reaches its operating system loading screen. The BIOS (basic input/output system) will be automatically loaded at this point. If necessary, press any key to enter BIOS setup mode.
  4. Use the arrow keys on your keyboard to navigate to “Advanced Mode,” and press Enter twice. A list of options will be displayed, including “Fan Speed Priorities” (see photo below). 
  5. Use the arrow keys to highlight “Fan Speed Priorities” and then use your mouse to select it with a left-click or two-finger click. The default setting for this option is “CPU Localization Priority,” meaning that processor cooling is given priority over all other components in fan speed. 
  6. To change the fan speed setting, use the arrow keys to move the slider to the left or right and press Enter. The default setting is “Auto,” meaning that the motherboard automatically adjusts fan speed based on processor temperature. 
  7. Press Esc to exit BIOS setup mode and return to your computer’s desktop.

What causes fan noise?

A fan is a device that helps to keep a computer or other electronic device cool by transferring air through the device. In most cases, a fan is attached to the motherboard and uses spinning blades to circulate air.

See also  What is GPU Scaling: A Beginner's Guide to Display Scaling

When the computer is running hot, the fan helps to circulate the heat away from the components and out of the machine.

There are many different reasons why a computer might start making noise. One common problem is overheating, which can cause computer fans to spin faster to move more air.

Overheating can also damage hardware and cause other problems, so monitoring your computer’s temperature and taking any necessary action if it starts making too much noise is important.

Another possible cause of fan noise is dirty fans. Over time, dust and other particles can build up on a fan’s blades, causing them to spin faster than they should.

This causes unnecessary noise and can eventually lead to damage. Cleaning your fans regularly can help prevent this type of problem from occurring.

Finally, some fans make noise because they’re not properly installed or configured. For example, if your computer has two or more fans installed, one might be spinning much slower than the others due to inadequate airflow.

This can cause them all to make noise together. Correcting these issues by installing better-quality fans or adjusting their settings can often fix the problem.

How to fix fan noise on your motherboard

If you notice that your computer is making excessive fan noise, there may be a solution on hand. Many motherboard manufacturers include a “sys fan on the motherboard.”

This feature allows users to control the speed and volume of their system fans through the BIOS or software interface.

In most cases, increasing the fan speed will reduce the amount of noise your computer makes. Additionally, disabling unnecessary fans or modifying their speeds may also help to reduce noise levels.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is Sys Fan On Motherboard?

Sys Fan On Motherboard is a BIOS/UEFI feature that allows the system to control how much fan speed to use. This can help reduce noise levels and improve cooling performance. 

Why is Sys Fan On Motherboard important?

Sys Fan On Motherboard can improve system cooling and reduce noise levels. 

How do I enable Sys Fan On Motherboard?

You can enable Sys Fan On Motherboard in your BIOS/UEFI by selecting the option from the fan speed settings.

Conclusion

Sys Fan On Motherboard is a system that monitors and controls various aspects of your computer’s performance, including the CPU, memory, and graphics card.

Sys Fan On Motherboard can also help protect your computer from overheating and other issues. If you’re experiencing some trouble with your computer and want to try out Sys Fan On Motherboard, be sure to read our full review first!


Share post on
Matt Wilson
By Matt Wilson

Matt Wilson is a PC gaming and hardware expert with years of experience. He's a trusted tech product reviewer for gamers and tech enthusiasts.


PCedged is reader-supported. When you buy through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Knowledge Base

Tips to Lower Your Internet Bill

 Everyone needs a good home internet connection today. However, a good internet is anything...

By Matt Wilson
Updated
How To Add More SATA Ports To Your Motherboard? Knowledge Base

How To Add More SATA Ports To Your Motherboard?

SATA, which is short for Serial Advanced Technology Attachment, is the current industry standard...

By Matt Wilson
Updated
Test Motherboards Without A CPU Knowledge Base

Test Motherboards Without A CPU

The motherboard is one of the most important components in any computer. It connects...

By Matt Wilson
Updated
Can PCI-E X4 Card Fit In X16 Slot? Knowledge Base

Can PCI-E X4 Card Fit In X16 Slot?

There are many questions that a PC builder may be asking when trying to...

By Matt Wilson
Updated
How To Buy Used Graphics Cards? Find Out the Solution Knowledge Base

How To Buy Used Graphics Cards? Find Out the Solution

Recently, I was looking to purchase a graphics card for my PC but needed...

By Matt Wilson
Updated
How To Test RGB Fans Without Motherboard Knowledge Base

How To Test RGB Fans Without Motherboard

RGB fans are the latest trend in computer hardware. They have a fan blade...

By Matt Wilson
Updated
Upgrade Your Minecraft Experience with These Powerful Graphics Cards! Knowledge Base

Upgrade Your Minecraft Experience with These Powerful Graphics Cards!

Minecraft is one of the most popular video games of all time for a...

By Matt Wilson
Updated
What Is a Discrete Graphics Card and Why Do You Need One? Knowledge Base

What Is a Discrete Graphics Card and Why Do You Need One?

A discrete graphics card is a specialized hardware designed for gaming and other high-performance...

By Matt Wilson
Updated